Advocacy

GPSA represents the interests of grain producers by engaging with decision-makers of all tiers of government to advocate for better outcomes on policy and programs relevant to grain production businesses in South Australia.

GM crops

Key points

  • The ban on the commercial cultivation of genetically modified crops has been lifted across mainland SA
  • Restrictions on the commercial cultivation of GM crops will continue to apply on Kangaroo Island indefinitely.
  • Growers are strongly encouraged to undertake GM crop accreditation courses offered by technology providers. These courses cover details on agronomic management and stewardship obligations. They must be completed before growers can access GM varieties.
  • This decision is the culmination of years of advocacy by GPSA and the broader industry.

View this information as a PDF.

Resources for growing GM crops

PIRSA has established an information portal for producers looking to understand how to access GM crops, or for information on coexistence principals.

Further industry information on growing GM crops is available below.

Mining on Agricultural Land – Land Access Inquiry

Key points

  • A Select Committee has been established to inquire and report on SA’s land access arrangements concerning mining and exploration activity on agricultural land, thanks to a push from the expanded crossbench in the Lower House of State Parliament.
  • Public hearings are being held in Wudinna, Tumby Bay and Ardrossan
  • GPSA will formally present to the Committee on 17 July 2021
  • You can read GPSA’s submission to the Select Committee here. 

Overview

GPSA welcomes the establishment of the Parliamentary Select Committee Inquiry on land access arrangements for
mineral exploration companies.

A Select Committee has been established to inquire and report on SA’s land access arrangements concerning mining and exploration activity on agricultural land, thanks to a push from the expanded crossbench in the Lower House of State Parliament.

One of the key purposes of the Inquiry is to report on and make recommendations as to measures that should be implemented to achieve a best practice model in South Australia, that balances the rights of landowners and those seeking to access land for exploration.

This is an important opportunity to undertake a thorough and meaningful review of existing laws, independent of the department charged with both promoting and regulating the regime.

GPSA has strongly advocated for an independent review of SA’s resources law since 2017. GPSA have developed a long list of policy reforms that are yet to be enacted, and we continue to push for fairer outcomes for farmers both publicly and behind the scenes.

SA farmers have reported a range of unsatisfactory dealings with exploration companies, including explorers failing to comply with their obligation to compensate landholders for drilling, and failing to remedy drill holes despite this forming part of their land access conditions.

This has contributed to both disputes and high levels of stress for many farmers faced with these issues.

The Inquiry now offers the chance for individuals, community groups and industry bodies to put forward their views directly to policymakers. This is the next logical step in progressing meaningful reform in this area, being timely to shed a light on the performance of the existing arrangements in SA and consider how other jurisdictions mange the process of exploration, mining and extraction of agricultural land.

The importance of this inquiry extends to the many farming families who have been impacted by resource entities seeking access to cropping land across large areas of both the Eyre and Yorke peninsulas.

The final report is set to be tabled in November this year, ahead of the 2022 election.

Committee Membership

As appointed on 02 March 2021, Select Committee on Land Access membership is as follows; 

Terms of Reference 

(a) Land access regimes as they relate to mining and mining exploration under the Mining Act 1971, the Opal Mining Act 1995 and the Petroleum and Geothermal Energy Act 2000.

(b) Such operations of the Department for Energy and Mining as may relate to, or be affected by, land access regimes;

(c) The practices of interstate and overseas jurisdictions as they relate to balancing the rights of landowners and those seeking to access land in order to explore for or exploit minerals, precious stones or regulated substances;

(d) Administrative and legislative options that may help achieve a best practice model in South Australia that balances the rights of landowners and those seeking to access land to explore for or exploit minerals, precious stones or regulated substances;

(e) Measures that should be implemented to achieve a best practice model in South Australia that balances the rights of landowners and those seeking to access land to explore for or exploit minerals, precious stones or regulated substances (to the extent that such measures are not being addressed through existing programs or initiatives); and

(f) Any other related matter

Biosecurity

The South Australian Government is in the process of developing a new Biosecurity Act with the aim to provide a simpler, modern and more effective legislative framework for the management of pests and diseases, plant and animal product trade, and response to biosecurity emergencies.

South Australia’s current biosecurity system is provided for by a number of different Acts, which can add complexity. The new Biosecurity Act will consolidate these Acts into a modern framework for managing SA’s biosecurity and provide a more cohesive and flexible approach to managing biosecurity risks.

GPSA has convened a Biosecurity Taskforce to identify growers’ key industry priorities in regard to the consolidated Act and to inform GPSA’s submission to Government.

More information on the development of the new Biosecurity Act is available on the PIRSA website.